Tag Archives: CCA/Munis

California Assembly Bill 2145 is dead

By Roy L Hales

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California’s monopoly utilities failed in what many perceive as their latest attempt to squash community choice aggregates. Assemblyman Steven Bradford could not find a senator willing to sponsor his controversial bill. So it expired when the legislature’s current session ended, at 3 am on Friday night. California Assembly Bill 2145 is dead.

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Is PG&E making a mockery of California Senate Bill 790?

By Roy L Hales

California Senate Bill 790 (SB 790) bans utility companies from using ratepayer funds for negative publicity campaigns against local community utilities ( community choice aggregators, or CCA). They are now required to file the details of any anti-CCA marketing with the California Public Utilities Commission. Only PG&E has not filed in the case of AB 2145 (popularly known as the “Monopoly Protection Act” ) because the marketing is being done by associated third parties. Doesn’t this make a mockery of California Senate Bill 790?

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California’s Second Community Choice Utility Goes Online

By Roy L Hales

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Sonoma Clean Power is now supplying power to 16,845 commercial and 6,225 residential customers. Over the next two years, all customers in the unincorporated areas of the county, Santa Rosa, Windsor, Cotati, Sebastopol and Sonoma will become eligible for service. On May 1, 2014, California’s second community choice utility goes online.

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Boulder and the Spread of Community Choice Utilities

By Roy L Hales

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Boulder Colorado’s election results are being heralded as yet another “solar victory,” in a string that stretches back to the Louisiana and Idaho Public Utilities Commissions decisions earlier this year. The relevant questions on the ballot, however, pertain to Boulder’s attempt to join more than 1,300 American communities that have formed their own utility.

Question 310 would have required voter approval before the city issued bonds to pay for Xcel’s equipment and run its own utility, was defeated by a 2:1 margin (21,100 to 9,543).

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