Tag Archives: Chinook Salmon

Fish and Watersheds

In recent weeks, Hyacinthe Creek – one of a handful of  salmon bearing streams on Quadra Island – has experienced a few salmon swimming up its waters. Their arrival has not been an easy journey!

Life for all adult salmon, for millennia, has been a series of survival challenges. Depending upon the species, life cycles range from 2 years (Pinks) to 7 years (Chinook). For new born salmon referred to as fry, making it from their Coastal and or Interior BC birth streams to salt water can require many weeks to months of learning what to eat, while being swept over waterfalls to then crash through rapids for many more kilometers downstream. 

Continue reading Fish and Watersheds

Harvesting salmon eggs on Cortes and the Greater Campbell River area

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) is working with local groups to harvest salmon eggs throughout the Greater Campbell River area. 

Continue reading Harvesting salmon eggs on Cortes and the Greater Campbell River area

Southern resident killer whales are not starving due to lack of BC chinook, study finds

The widespread belief that at-risk southern resident killer whales are starving due to a lack of chinook salmon has been debunked. 

Continue reading Southern resident killer whales are not starving due to lack of BC chinook, study finds

Tongue of the glacier: Elliot Creek landslide, Bute Inlet, 2020

No one was in Bute Inlet’s Southgate Valley when rock and ice above Elliot Creek launched itself 6000 feet down from the Homathko Icefield into a glacial lake.

Did anyone hear, see or feel anything?

Continue reading Tongue of the glacier: Elliot Creek landslide, Bute Inlet, 2020

Cross-border Salish Sea study finds key puzzle pieces of wild salmon die-off

National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

For millennia, the Salish Sea — the shared body of water linking northwestern Washington state and southern B.C. and encompassing the Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Strait of Georgia — was abundant with salmon.

The keystone species is the bedrock of the entire ecosystem of the Pacific Northwest. All seven species of Pacific salmon populated the Salish Sea — sustaining a host of other iconic animals, such as bald eagles, southern resident killer whales, and grizzlies, along with their surrounding aquatic and terrestrial environments and scores of Indigenous nations and cultures.

But beginning in the late 1970s, salmon survival, particularly for chinook, coho, and steelhead — which migrate to the ocean like salmon, but can spawn multiple times — began a mysterious downward slide, especially in the marine environment, said Isobel Pearsall, director of marine science at the Pacific Salmon Foundation (PSF). 

Continue reading Cross-border Salish Sea study finds key puzzle pieces of wild salmon die-off