Tag Archives: Forestry Emissions

First of 4 cultural events from Sierra Quadra: World Premiere of the Ridge

Sierra Quadra is bringing Robert Bringhurst’s poem ‘The Ridge‘ to  the Quadra Community Centre, at 7:30 PM on Saturday October 21st.

In an interview with Cortes Currents, Ray Grigg said he believes this is the 80 minute long poem’s world premiere.  

It is also the first of four performances Sierra Quadra is putting on this year. They also have two films lined up. On Dec 16, 2023, they will be showing ‘Once You Know’ and on Feb 3, 2024, ‘Keepers of the Land.’ A fourth event is still being planned.

Continue reading First of 4 cultural events from Sierra Quadra: World Premiere of the Ridge

First Nations leader celebrates evolution of stewardship in Great Bear Rainforest

A model for environmental protection may become much more.

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

There are new measures to better protect bear and fish habitat in the globe’s largest remaining coastal temperate rainforest, thanks to First Nations’ increasing role in stewarding the Great Bear Rainforest (GBR).

The new protections resulted from the latest five-year review of an agreement between the B.C. Ministry of Forests and two First Nations alliances — Coastal First Nations and Nanwakolas Council — which represent 11 of the 26 Nations with territory in the rainforest.

Continue reading First Nations leader celebrates evolution of stewardship in Great Bear Rainforest

Logging pollution is on the rise — but don’t expect to find it on the accounting books

By Natasha Bulowski, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

As the world uses more and more wood over the next few decades, the planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions associated with logging will rise, new research predicts.

Yet many of these emissions are not currently attributed to the logging industry because widely used accounting methods leave the impression that wood harvests only marginally increase carbon emissions or don’t increase them at all, according to new research published in Nature.

Continue reading Logging pollution is on the rise — but don’t expect to find it on the accounting books

The Quadra Project – Logging’s Carbon – Part 2

Click here to access part one

Loggers on Quadra Island are confronted with a dilemma. Whether they cut trees from TFL 47 or from any of the 11 licenced woodlots, the carbon stored in the forests is released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, thereby contributing to the climate crisis. But loggers are required by law, as operators of their tenures, to cut an annual amount of merchantable wood—measured as cubic metres—to earn royalties, called stumpage, for government revenue. Because most logged wood becomes the raw material used for making paper, packaging and many other disposable products, most of the cut wood is quickly consumed or discarded, and its stored carbon is released into the atmosphere as CO2 within the first year following logging—only about 20% of the cubic metres measured as forest product is sequestered up to a century as lumber for buildings or as kept objects such as furniture.

Continue reading The Quadra Project – Logging’s Carbon – Part 2

The Quadra Project: Logging’s Carbon – Part 1

Click here to access part two

The global climate crisis is forcing us to restructure our thinking about almost everything we do. In the last two centuries, rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the single most influential greenhouse gas, have risen from 280 parts per million to 419 ppm, and are now threatening to literally cook us off the planet. At the seemingly modest temperature rise of 1.2°C, we are already starting to experience the disastrous effects on climate, species, ocean levels, weather patterns, food production, human health, and our general sense of physical and psychological wellbeing. Meanwhile, as carbon dioxide emissions continue to go up rather than down, the circumstances invite a paradigm shift in our thinking.

Continue reading The Quadra Project: Logging’s Carbon – Part 1