Tag Archives: Forestry on Cortes

Mark Lombard looks back over this past year in the Cortes community forest

(The first in a series of articles coming out of the Cortes Forestry General Partnership’s 2022 AGM)

This has been the Cortes Community Forest’s most profitable year, but that is not the Cortes Forestry General Partnership’s only objective. 

“I always start with what areas do we want to keep,” explained General Manager Mark Lombard. 

He used a recent conversation to illustrate how Cortes is taking a different approach than the industry at large. 

Continue reading Mark Lombard looks back over this past year in the Cortes community forest

David Shipway’s public letter to Mosaic

Attn: Colin Koszman/ Land Use Forester, Molly Hudson/ Director of Sustainability

I started my working life in the late 60’s, surveying cutblocks and new roads with MacMillan Bloedel on many of the lands now being managed by Mosaic – up in the headwaters of the Oyster, the Quinsam, the Campbell, the Eve and the Salmon. I witnessed the last of the valley bottom old growth being logged, magnificent cedar groves that would now be considered a national treasure, and saw the montaine plateaus of Mountain Hemlock, ancient Yellow Cedar and Western Yew before anyone had touched them.

Continue reading David Shipway’s public letter to Mosaic

A Brief History of Forest Activism on Cortes Island

[researched and written by Mike Moore, edited and produced for radio by De Clarke]

Cortes Islanders are very aware that we live on an island. The landbase has a very defined perimeter with the ocean; but the way the land wraps around and encloses the island’s many harbours and bays means that the land has a very intimate and close connection with the ocean. We know that the land, lakes, creeks and ocean are all interrelated.

Standing on a Cortes beach allows one to see what is happening on the lands around us in a bigger perspective. From Smelt Bay, we could witness the clearcuts sprawling across the mountainsides on Vancouver Island. From either side of Sutil Point, we could see the pulp mills in Campbell River and Powell River belching steam and smoke into the sky.

Continue reading A Brief History of Forest Activism on Cortes Island

Cortes Island community  discusses Mosaic Forestry Management’s logging plans

CKTZ News, through an LJI grant from Canada-info.ca

In response to Mosaic Forest Management’s proposed logging activity on Cortes Island, announced in January, a public meeting was held outdoors at the Village Commons lot in Mansons Landing on March 12. More than 30 people attended on the cold and rainy day under a tent set up for the event.

Continue reading Cortes Island community  discusses Mosaic Forestry Management’s logging plans

Behind Every Great Timber Fortune…?

“Behind every great fortune lies a great crime.” — Honoré de Balzac

On the 21st of January 2022, a notice appeared in Cortes Tideline, from Mosaic (a “forest management corporation” which handles logistics for TimberWest and Island Timberlands). The gist of it was captured in one sentence: “As we have now been able to spend some time becoming familiar with our private managed forest lands on Cortes Island, we would like to share details of our draft three-year plan with those interested from communities on Cortes Island.”

Mosaic was careful to include the important word “private” in their announcement — a reminder that some 9 percent of Cortes forest land is still owned by private timber companies (not Crown land), and that (since 2003 at least) “privately managed forest lands” are a different kettle of fish.

Most coastal residents are aware, on some level, that vast tracts of BC are privately owned by timber companies, whereas other tracts of land are “Crown land” where logging takes place under licence. Few, however, are aware of how that situation — and the inconsistent policies and rules governing the two different land types — came about.

Continue reading Behind Every Great Timber Fortune…?