Tag Archives: history

Transformations On the Shore: Local Art

Since its inception in 1997, Campbell River‘s chainsaw sculpture show, “Transformations on the Shore,” has been a favourite event for both locals and tourists. Artists come from as far away as Alberta to participate in the summertime live sculpting event.

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Paths of Beauty

By Roy L Hales

While I interviewed Rick Bockner last year, it was a musician’s story minus the music.  So here it is again, with eight songs inserted into the audio. His musical roots go back to the McCarthy era, when the United States was purging itself of anything that could be labelled communist. Pete Seeger gave him tips on how to play the guitar. He was a member of the psychedelic rock band Mad River, which released two albums in San Francisco before it disbanded in 1969. On Cortes Island, he is somewhat of a musical icon. In addition to being a songwriter, he is one of the key organizers of Lovefest and the face of CKTZ’s Lip Syncs for the past decade. In this morning’s interview, Rick Bockner talks about paths of beauty.

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The 1960s & 70s – A Time Of Transition

By Roy L Hales

This is the second in a series of broadcasts in which Andy Ellingsen describes the changes he has seen on Cortes Island. In this episode he talks about the 1960s & 70’s – a time of transition. 

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These Are My Words

By Manda Aufochs Gillespie

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life. 

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