Tag Archives: Indiginews

Rez culture isn’t our culture, says Chief Clarence Louie (y̓ilmixʷm ki law na)

By Athena Bonneau, The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Chief Clarence Louie (y̓ilmixʷm ki law na) of the Osoyoos Indian Band (OIB) wants people to know that “rez culture” is not his culture — and he’s written a book about it. 

Continue reading Rez culture isn’t our culture, says Chief Clarence Louie (y̓ilmixʷm ki law na)

Food for the frontlines — honouring Indigenous ingenuity during a colonial holiday

By Kelsie Kilawna, The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Canadians getting ready to cozy up with family over the Thanksgiving weekend should question exactly what they’re celebrating, says Secwépemc hereditary matriarch Miranda Dick.  

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‘In our grief, rage and love’ says mother of Indigenous man killed by RCMP

the Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

This article contains accounts of police violence, as well as accounts of racism and hate against Indigenous people that could be triggering. Please read with care.

A busy pier forms the backdrop to the small courtyard next to Island Funeral Services funeral home in Campbell River on July 20. Alunaye, Laura Holland sits in the shade of a nearby maple tree, waiting for the memorial ceremony for her son to begin. 

Continue reading ‘In our grief, rage and love’ says mother of Indigenous man killed by RCMP

Drastic droughts on the horizon, if syilx laws not upheld

By Kelsie Kilawna, The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

As devastating wildfires spread through B.C.’s interior, skawilx (Sarah Alexis) says there’s a parallel crisis that demands attention and action — droughts. 

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Telling children about residential schools

By Anna McKenzie,  The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

This article contains content about residential schools that may be triggering. Support for survivors and their families is available. Call the Indian Residential School Survivors Society at 1-800-721-0066, 1-866-925-4419 for the 24-7 crisis line. The KUU-US Crisis Line Society also offers 24-7 support at 250-723-4050 for adults, 250-723-2040 for youth, or toll free at 1-800-588-8717.

In the aftermath of the shocking news of 215 children’s bodies being discovered in a mass burial site at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, IndigiNews spoke with educators to gather resources on how to engage with children and youth.

Continue reading Telling children about residential schools