Tag Archives: Inflation

CCEDA Conversation Café: Food Security

CCEDA continued its series of Conversation Cafés on Thursday December 7th at the Gorge Hall, to discuss the issue of “food security on Cortes Island.” Facilitated by Colin Funk and organised by Kate Maddigan, the event attracted over 20 participants.

CCEDA will be releasing a detailed report on the results of this guided discussion; in the meantime, Currents can offer our readers an overview and a few highlights.

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Rachel Blaney on  the Housing Crisis, Homelessness and Campbell River’s treatment of the Art Gallery

When you get to Cortes, you can multiply all those economic stressors by three or four because we have  clients who have been suffering for years with precarious employment, precarious housing, and higher food costs than mainland food costs.” – Cortes Island Food Bank

It’s been a month since hundreds of Campbell River residents were shocked to learn that their city council appeared to be punishing the local art gallery for not confronting the homeless people camped outside its doors.  As city councilor Ron Kerr put it, “We certainly don’t need to give them tax deferrals if they’re not working with us.”

Local MP Rachel Blaney referred to the incident in the House of Commons when speaking about the housing and homelessness crisis:

“My region has seen the largest increase of unhoused people on record. There was a 106% jump in the Comox Valley and almost 70% percent in Campbell River. This is a catastrophe. The Prime Minister says housing is not a federal responsibility, as people and communities move beyond a crisis point. This while Conservative council members in Campbell River have begun targeting non-profits who provide essential services to the unhoused. When are the Liberals going to be an actual federal partner and build people homes? ” 

Continue reading Rachel Blaney on  the Housing Crisis, Homelessness and Campbell River’s treatment of the Art Gallery

Inside Vancouver’s Decision to Scrap Its Living Wage Commitment

Editor’s note: in a memo to the city council one year after the Living Wage program was introduced, City Manager (now Cortes Island resident) Sadhu Johnston reported, “During 2017, the City of Vancouver and Vancouver Park Board signed or renegotiated 17 contracts that meet the Living Wage program criteria with vendors to ensure their staff and subcontractors are paid the living wage. Since the introduction of the policy, eight contracted service employees received a living wage who would not otherwise have been paid one. These employees are part of the contracted graffiti removal team and the contractor has reported reductions in absenteeism, turnover and recruitment costs as well as increased morale and productivity.”

By  Zak Vescera, The Tyee, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Internal emails suggest City of Vancouver staff felt “significant anger and disillusionment” after city council voted to scrap the municipality’s living wage policy this year.

That’s how former chief equity officer Aftab Erfan described the reaction from staff after the city announced in March it would no longer guarantee a living wage, effectively cutting the guaranteed minimum pay for security guards, food vendors, janitors and other low-wage workers. Erfan left the job four months later.

Continue reading Inside Vancouver’s Decision to Scrap Its Living Wage Commitment

Affordable units cut from 6-storey Port Moody development that would relocate heritage building

Editor’s note: A disturbing story highlighting a problem that needs to be watched.

By Patrick Penner, Tri-Cities Dispatch, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Affordable housing has been cut from a development proposal seeking to build a pair of six-storey mixed-use buildings in Port Moody’s historic downtown area.

Fourteen units out of 184 total were initially proposed as below-market rentals for the 10-lot development on the 2400-block of Clarke Street.

During early input in January, Port Moody city staff recommended five more affordable units be included, as the application had less than half the 15 percent requirement for density bonusing.

But the developer, Placemaker Communities, now says inflationary impacts on construction costs and rising interest rates related to project financing have made any below-market units financially unfeasible.

Continue reading Affordable units cut from 6-storey Port Moody development that would relocate heritage building

Corporations are winning the inflation bump, while Canadians struggle with high prices

By Natasha Bulowski, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

As Canadians struggle to afford essential goods and services, the spoils of inflation are ending up largely in corporate profits, particularly in oil, gas and mining industries, a new analysis reveals.

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) crunched the numbers to see how much more Canadians spent over the last two years due to inflation and pinpointed which industries benefited the most.

Continue reading Corporations are winning the inflation bump, while Canadians struggle with high prices