Tag Archives: Judith Williams

Judith Williams New Book

Zaida & August Schnarr with their daughters Pansy and (baby) Pearl – courtesy Judith Williams

By Roy L Hales

Judith Williams new book, Cougar Companions: Bute Inlet Country and the Legendary Schnarrs is the twenty-fourth issue of Raincoast Chronicles. She traces the Schnarr’s family story through a combination of diaries, interviews and rare photographs. 

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New Threat To Desolation Sound

By Roy L Hales

In the summer of 2016, a subsidiary of one of the world’s leading aggregate companies announced it was about to commence exploratory surface drilling in the Lloyd Creek Area of Desolation Sound. This is in close proximity to the region’s foremost kayak and boating area and, consequently, brings a substantial income to local businesses. Had the venture gone forward, one of the regions few remaining old growth forests would have been cut down, an important fish bearing creek would have been devastated and a number of important indigenous sites would have been threatened. Lehigh Hanson Materials abandoned its application, but local author Judith Williams talks about a new threat to Desolation Sound.

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The Arborglyph That Survived

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times.

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The Trail From Pre-contact Toba Inlet

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two.

Toba Inlet is a remote fjord roughly 180 kilometres north of Vancouver. It is geographically closer to Campbell River, though the trip is an hour and 45 minutes by water taxi. A recently discovered arborglyph, believed to be a trail marker, suggests this area was not so isolated in pre-colonial days. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the trail from pre-contact Toba Inlet to the rest of British Columbia.

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