Tag Archives: Kuterra Project

Fish farm providing Salmon smolts to Kuterra

North Island Gazette, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Kuterra, North America’s first land-based fish farm, has formalized an agreement to procure salmon smolts from ocean-based farmers Cermaq Canada for the next four years.

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Stop Using Open-Net Pens For Salmon Farming

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

A First Nations leadership alliance is calling for the immediate end to salmon farming using open-net pens in B.C. waters, citing the threat of sea lice to wild fish stocks.

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Kuterra leased to US investment firm

North Island Gazette, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Kuterra Salmon, started by the ‘Namgis First Nation in 2013 to demonstrate that on-land fish farming was possible, has been leased to American investor Emergent Holdings for 15 years.

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Remove the Broughton Archipelago’s Open-Net Fish Farms

Marine Harvest did not have the consent of local First Nations,  when they set up an open net fish farm off Swanson Island farm thirty-one-years ago.  They did not need it, with a Social Credit government ruling British Columbia. Only this is 2017, the courts recognize aboriginal title, and Premier John Horgan is more conscious of First Nation’s concerns. At the invitation of Chief Bob Chamberlain of Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation, Horgan and three of his top cabinet ministers visited Alert Bay. They met with forty Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) leaders, who demanded Horgan remove the Broughton Archipelago’s open net fish farms.

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Bring Salmon Farms On Land

By Roy L Hales

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Canada’s $2 billion Aquaculture industry is embroiled in controversy. While there may be some debate as to whether wild salmon spread more infections to British Columbia’s penned stock or vice versa,[1] there have been incidents like the Queen Charlotte Strait’s 2015 sea lice epidemic.[2] On May 20, 2016, Dr Kristi Miller, from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, announced that there is “a potential Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation (HSMI) in farmed Atlantic salmon samples” collected from a aquaculture facility off the coast of Vancouver Island. In Norway, where HSMI is more common, this disease is “associated with generally low mortality on farms, generally between 0 to 20%.”[3] The stress (and thus mortality rate) is undoubtedly greater on wild salmon, which need to capture prey, escape predators and swim upstream to spawn. So, acting on behalf of marine biologist Alexandra Morton, ECOjustice is suing Canada’s Ministry of Fisheries for putting wild salmon at risk. Some argue the best answer is to bring salmon farms on land.

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