Tag Archives: Matteo Cimellaro

Eyes turn to B.C. as U.S. pauses approval of LNG projects

Editor’s note: According to Natural Resources Canada, “There are eight liquefied natural gas (LNG) export projects in various stages of development across Canada.” At one point there were 20 proposals in BC alone. One of them was on the old mill site in Campbell River. The most recent post Cortes Currents could find on the web was a Jan 21, 2019 article in the Campbell River Mirror which states a Calgary-based company, Rockyview Resources Inc, purchased the property in May 2016. “Rockyview is an oil and gas exploration firm that aims to build a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at the site, a project dubbed Discovery LNG.”  The company’s website is no longer operational and Rockyview Resources Inc was ‘struck off the registry’ of Alberta Corporations on Nov 2, 2017. Discovery LNG is not on Canada’s list of LNG ‘Projects proposed and under construction,’ but it is listed as one of Campbell River’s top 10 municipal taxpayers for 2022 (albeit under a different owner).

By Matteo Cimellaro, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Calls from climate advocates to follow the lead of the United States and pause Canadian liquified natural gas projects face a serious challenge: a promise of economic reconciliation tied to capital and liquified natural gas (LNG) development.

Biden’s move to pause LNG approvals until after the November elections was celebrated by the climate movement in the U.S. and at home. But coastal First Nations leading LNG projects say the facilities will boost their communities’ prosperity. With industry partners, Haisla Nation is developing Cedar LNG and Ksi Lisims is proposed by the Nisga’a.

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Frantic escapes, damaged homes and lost time: First Nations hit hardest when wildfire season comes

By Matteo Cimellaro, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Debbie Rupke (Tomma) heard a rattle at her door. It was her cousin in a panic, telling her they had only minutes to leave. Strong winds had shifted, and the Bushcreek fire, which has burned at least 43,084 hectares north of Kelowna so far, was bearing down on their homes. Rupke (Tomma) had returned from Vancouver the day before, so she grabbed her yet-to-be-unpacked suitcase and her most precious memento: a family portrait of her daughter she gave up for adoption at 15.

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Mining companies are snapping up claims to develop Indigenous land. But what happens when a nation doesn’t consent?

By Matteo Cimellaro, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Reconciliation isn’t the only thing threatened when mining exploration companies fail to get consent from Indigenous nations, says one ethical investor.

Provinces — and the junior mining companies that obtain exploration permits connected to a nation’s ancestral territories — ignore consultation with Indigenous Peoples at their own peril, as the oversight can set the stage for future conflict, court challenges and delays, hampering any future economic development before it begins.

Continue reading Mining companies are snapping up claims to develop Indigenous land. But what happens when a nation doesn’t consent?

First Nation launches court challenge testing B.C.’s legal commitment to recognizing Indigenous rights

By Matteo Cimellaro, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

An online form and $58.75.

That is what it takes to claim a mining stake in the traditional territory of the Gitxaała Nation, according to a written submission to the B.C. Supreme Court. At no point in the process does the mining claim, accessed through a provincial portal, ask the individual or company applying for it to consult with the nation. 

For this reason, the Gitxaała Nation is challenging B.C.’s Mineral Tenure Act in a case that will test whether the province’s legal commitment to recognizing the rights of Indigenous Peoples has the teeth to change laws. 

Continue reading First Nation launches court challenge testing B.C.’s legal commitment to recognizing Indigenous rights