Tag Archives: Pembina Institute

What Does The NDP-Green Agreement Mean?

By Roy L Hales

Though still nominally premier, Christy Clark knows her government’s days are numbered. If she doesn’t resign, the BC Liberals will be toppled by a non confidence motion when the provincial legislature reassembles in June. Clark intends to continue as Leader of the Opposition. So what does the NDP-Green agreement mean for British Columbians?
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Do The Pacific Coast’s Climate Leaders Mean Business?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1On June 1, 2016, the Governors of Washington, Oregon and California joined British Columbia’s Environment Minister and representatives from six West Coast cities, in the Borgia Room of San Francisco’s Westin St. Francis Hotel, to sign what history may show was a key milestone in the struggle to mount a concerted defence against the ravages of global temperature rise. The 2016 Pacific Coast Climate Leadership Action Plan has a strong emphasis on issues like ocean acidification; the integration of clean energy into the power grid; “support for efforts by the insurance industry and regulatory system to highlight the economic costs of climate change; and so-called “super pollutants” (also known as short-lived climate pollutants).” This sounds good, but do the Pacific Coast’s “Climate Leaders” mean business?

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Can Canada Build More Pipelines? Or LNG Facilities?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1In a recent interview with the ECOreport, Simon Fraser University Climate Scientist Dr, Kirsten Zickfeld described Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s idea of fighting climate change while expanding the oil sands and building new pipelines as “delusional.” There is only a finite amount of carbon we can release into the atmosphere and if we hope keep the global temperature rise to 2 degrees C. We are already close to 1.5 degrees and may pass that threshold this year. Even if we do not build any new fossil fuel infrastructure, Canada will exhaust “its’ fair share” of carbon emissions by 2030. These were quite strong statements, so I asked a couple of other scientists – as well as environmentalists, politicians and government spokespersons – Can Canada build more pipelines? Or LNG facilities?
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Lelu Island Could Become Canada’s Largest Carbon Polluter

By Roy L Hales

One of the smartest things Premier Christy Clark’s government has done was ask Matt Horne, of the Pembina Institute, to join BC’s Climate Leadership Team last year. The credibility they gained from that single act opened the door to new possibilities. Unfortunately that door appears to have shut . Premier Clark chose to ignore the suggestions made by her Climate Leadership Team. Yesterday  Horne has released a statement that the proposed LNG facility on Lelu Island could become Canada’s largest carbon polluter.

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COP 21 reached An Agreement

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1COP 21 reached an agreement. Fossil fuel usage will be phased out by 2050. The international community will adopt a goal of keeping the global temperature rise at 1.5 degrees, but does not yet have the pledges that will make this possible. According to Adam Scott of Environmental Defence, in Paris, the current pledges will only limit the  rise to 3 degrees.

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