Tag Archives: Reservation System

Legislative amendments would allow First Nations to own land

Editor’s Note: When British Columbia seized control of the traditional territories of the Homalco, Klahoose, Tla’amin, We Wai Kai, Wei Wai Kum and most of the other First Nations in the province, they were pushed onto tiny parcels whose title was held by the Crown (reserves). According to the Pulling Together: Foundations Guide (2018):

  • “First Nations people were not consulted when reserves were created. They did not give consent.
  • They were not compensated for the lands that were taken from them.
  • Since their creation, reserves have been moved and reduced and their resources have been taken – all without compensation for First Nations.
  • Until as recently as 1958, people living on reserve needed written permission from the Indian Agent in order to leave the reserve for any reason.”

A report prepared for the BC Assembly of First Nations in 2023 states 35% of BC’s Indigenous population currently live on reserves.

By Alexandra Mehl, Ha-Shilth-Sa, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Victoria, BC – In early April the provincial government introduced legislative amendments to the B.C. Land Title and Property Law Act, that, if passed, will remove barriers for First Nation bands to acquire, hold and register land.

“Many people in Canada do not know that First Nations could not own land in the province of British Columbia,” said Hugh Braker of the First Nations Summit. “Many people don’t know that in British Columbia, other provinces and in the federal system there are still laws that discriminate against Indigenous people that are founded in racism.”

This year marks 150 years since the establishment of the B.C. Land Act which “explicitly forbid First Nation individuals from having interests in land,” said Murray Rankin, minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

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Homalco expand lands in Campbell River through purchase from Mosaic

Gleaned from various sites on the web

The Homalco First Nation recently expanded its Campbell River holdings by the purchase of 390 acres from Mosaic Forestry Management. Chief Darren Blaney and Rob Gough, CEO of Mosaic, signed the deal in a ceremony at Homalco Hall. 

“We are celebrating more than the acquisition of land for the Homalco people. The land deal has been decades in the making, and it lays the foundation for a future filled with promise and prosperity,” said Homalco Chief Darren Blaney in a press release. “Our community is strengthened by our connection to lands and resources, and our relationship with community. I want to thank Mosaic Forest Management for supporting this vision and making the sale a reality.” 

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‘Heartbreaking’: an overhead view of Coastal GasLink sediment spills into Wet’suwet’en waters, wetlands

By Matt Simmons, The Narwhal, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

Sleydo’ Molly Wickham was composed and quiet as she stared out the window of a helicopter flying over vast stretches of TC Energy’s Coastal GasLink pipeline on Wet’suwet’en territory (yintah). Below, a wide swath cut through forests and wetlands, crossing creeks and rivers. 

A wing chief of the Gidimt’en clan, Sleydo’ was part of a small group on a monitoring flight to document the contentious project’s impacts as soaring temperatures rapidly melted last winter’s heavy snowpack.

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Rez culture isn’t our culture, says Chief Clarence Louie (y̓ilmixʷm ki law na)

By Athena Bonneau, The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Chief Clarence Louie (y̓ilmixʷm ki law na) of the Osoyoos Indian Band (OIB) wants people to know that “rez culture” is not his culture — and he’s written a book about it. 

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Who Speaks For The Wet’suwet’en?

The Wet’suwet’en crises reached our area this week. There were a number of protests, the biggest of which took place in Campbell River on Feb 12, 2020. One of the key questions is, who speaks for Wet’suwet’en?

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