Tag Archives: Tla’amin

Klahoose & Tla’amin Nations Challenged by low salmon numbers

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

The Klahoose First Nation is challenged by low salmon numbers resulting in a lack of traditional food, social and cultural resources.

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Klahoose, K’omox, Tla’amin, Homalco – All one people

This radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

Some Canadians of European descent find the fact three Indigenous nations claim Cortes Island as their traditional territory confusing, but a member of the Klahoose Nation explained this in a recent interview. Norm Harry’s (“Tal-wa-ska“) father was originally xʷɛmaɬkʷu (Homalco) but became  ƛohos (Klahoose). Some of Norm’s uncles and aunts are ɬəʔamɛn (Tla’amin) and his family also has close relatives among the K’omox. As Norm Harry understands it, these nations were all one people before the Canadian government put them onto reservations. 

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Rezoning Hearing For Rainbow Ridge

Cortes Island’s best known housing project took another step towards realization at the January 29th, Strathcona Regional District Board meeting. The public hearing for rezoning a 2.45-hectare portion of the 20.75-hectare Rainbow Ridge property will be held in Mansons Hall at 1 PM on April 30, 2020. 

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Unresolved Indigenous Issues

By Roy L Hales

They occupied Cortes Radio’s broadcast area for thousands of years before the European advent. The Homalco, Tla’amin, Klahoose, and K’ómoks nations’ shared language testifies to their common ancestry. Their neighbours, the Laich-kwil-tach were fierce warriors, whose canoes carried raiders into the southern Georgia Strait, Puget Sound and up the Fraser River. (They attacked the Hudsons Bay Company post at Fort Langley in 1837). When the influx of settlers was sufficiently numerous, they took over. The indigenous population was deprived of lands they had occupied for generations. Their customs and governance was superseded. Prior to 1960, the native population could not vote in a Federal election unless they first surrendered their treaty rights and Indian status. This situation is slowly improving. The BC Treaty Commission was set up in 1992, but so far has only signed a single treaty within our area. So I asked the candidates running in the Powell River – North Island what their parties will do about unresolved indigenous issues  

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