Category Archives: History

Tl’emtl’ems Left Squirrel Cove

By Roy L Hales

Its almost 550 km from Squirrel Cove, on Cortes Island, to Puyallup, Washington by car, but centuries by canoe. In 1884 the Canadian Government joined in a conspiracy to destroy the canoe traffic that had been plying coastal waters, from Alaska to California, since the beginnings of oral tradition.  First Nations people were restricted to their reserves and had had to obtain permission to leave. The reawakening started almost 30 years ago, in what has since become an annual event.  A different nation hosts the gathering every year and this summer the gathering is at Puyallup. The Klahoose canoe Tl’emtl’ems left Squirrel Cove at 10 AM this morning. 

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The Trail From Pre-contact Toba Inlet

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two.

Toba Inlet is a remote fjord roughly 180 kilometres north of Vancouver. It is geographically closer to Campbell River, though the trip is an hour and 45 minutes by water taxi. A recently discovered arborglyph, believed to be a trail marker, suggests this area was not so isolated in pre-colonial days. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the trail from pre-contact Toba Inlet to the rest of British Columbia.

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Awaken the Canoes

Originally published on Cortes Radio,ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two.

What was the role of the canoe in pre-contact indigenous culture? What caused its decline? And how are canoe journeys helping the Klahoose and her sister nations rediscover their past? In this episode, producer Roy Hales asks how they awaken the canoes.

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Behind Toba Inlets Name

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two

Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the story behind Toba Inlet’s name.

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