Tag Archives: Ken Hanuse

The Arborglyph That Survived

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times.

Continue reading The Arborglyph That Survived

The Trail From Pre-contact Toba Inlet

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two.

Toba Inlet is a remote fjord roughly 180 kilometres north of Vancouver. It is geographically closer to Campbell River, though the trip is an hour and 45 minutes by water taxi. A recently discovered arborglyph, believed to be a trail marker, suggests this area was not so isolated in pre-colonial days. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the trail from pre-contact Toba Inlet to the rest of British Columbia.

Continue reading The Trail From Pre-contact Toba Inlet

Behind Toba Inlets Name

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season Two

Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the story behind Toba Inlet’s name.

Continue reading Behind Toba Inlets Name

Where Have All The Salmon Gone?

Originally published on Cortes Radio, as part of the Deep Roots Initiative, Season One.

Fishing was once a cornerstone of British Columbia’s economy, but we’ve been hearing stories of diminished runs and out of work fishermen for years. On Cortes Island, the fishing industry seems to mostly be spoken about in the past tense. So producer Roy L Hales set to to find out where have all the salmon gone?

Continue reading Where Have All The Salmon Gone?