All posts by Manda Aufochs Gillespie

Manda Aufochs Gillespie is a writer. She’s the author of the Green Mama series of books (https://thegreenmama.com/books/) and the publisher of the award-winning website thegreenmama.com. She is also a mother, neighbour, and founder of Folk University (folku.ca) on Cortes Island.

Coexisting With Bears On Cortes Island

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca. This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

What we can learn about coexisting with bears on Cortes Island an interview with Sabina Mense Leader

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Ayurveda: A Holistic Healing Science From The East

On the June 26th Folk U Friday: there was music, another Cortes resident gave gardening tips and Manda Aufochs Gillespie’s feature interview gave listeners a glimpse into one of the oldest traditional medicine from the East. Muneera Wallace is an Ayurveda practitioner.

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Folk U: Cortes Waste & Recycling Demystified

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca

There was music. Miyako Reid talked about her garden, chickens and other aspects of her life on Cortes. The feature presentation on the June 26th Folk U Friday was ‘Cortes Waste & Recycling Demystified.’

As people get more waste conscience, the people on Cortes Island can be proud to know that they have one of the most successful waste diversion programs in the region. And BC has created successful programs to deal with their waste, so that there are still markets for the recycling in BC despite unstable global systems.

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The View from a Guatemalan Children’s Village

Originally published on Cortes radio.ca. This radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

I first started taking my children to Guatemala when they were just one and five. It was an idea born on Cortes where two of my friends announced they were going to spend three or four months with their adopted son, so he’d have a chance to get better acquainted with this part of his heritage. Two of the first friends I met after moving to Canada had themselves just moved there to start a Children’s Village and I was excited to visit them. So, suddenly, I was moving to Guatemala for fourth months without my husband and without knowing enough Spanish to do more than order “Uno taco por favor.”

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