Tag Archives: Quadra Environment

Folk U: The Eye Of The Octopus

[from the Archives: July 25, 2020]

On the July 10th Folk U Friday: (1) Lucretia Shanfarber talked more about the Cortes Garden Club and things she’s learned about no dig gardening from gardens on Cortes and Quadra. (2) The main feature was Michael Moore explaining the mysterious underwater world of octopuses.

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Environmental design: learning to work with the natural water balance

In a previous interview, Bernie Amell said that development could take place in a manner that respects  the natural water balance. Amell is a co-owner of the environmental design firm Source2Source and a recognized authority in the design of constructed wetlands for water treatment, and in the restoration of streams and riparian habitats. He has presented his work at national and international water management professional conferences. One of his firm’s projects received national recognition from the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects last year. Amell lives on Quadra Island and in today’s interview, he talks about learning to work with the natural water balance.

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Quadra ICAN: Building community resilience through practical projects

“Our aim is to assist Quadra in becoming more resilient and self-sufficient in the face of impending ecological challenges. Our mandate is to organize and foster direct action on clearly defined practical projects.” – Quadra ICAN.ca

A decade ago, the first incarnation of ICAN (Island Climate Action Network) was responsible for getting a community garden started on Quadra. It also joined forces with Sierra Quadra to encourage Quadra’s retail sector to ban plastic bags, and started an anti-idling campaign. Team leader Leona Skovgaard traces the relaunch of the organization, now called Quadra ICAN, to a conversation that she and Jan Gladish had over tea.

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It Feels MUCH Hotter

Cortes Currents exclusive

Many years ago I watched a documentary covering different aspects about life in the high Arctic. Minutes were spent explaining how the arctic tundra was able to have such an explosion of blossoms from ground covering plants. The ground temperature was able to go much higher than in the open air, about 45 cm above.

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