Tag Archives: Fairy Creek Blockade

Fairy Creek Blockade is far from over

The Fairy Creek blockade is far from over and there is still a number of people from the Discovery Islands among the thousands going there. 

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Are Fairy Creek Activists aligned with First Nations?

National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Huu-ay-aht Chief Coun. Robert J. Dennis Sr. is blunt in his assessment of old-growth activists in southwestern Vancouver Island who remain in First Nations’ territories despite being asked to leave.

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BC deferring old growth logging in Fairy Creek

At the request of the Pacheedaht, Ditidaht and Huu-ay-aht First Nations, BC is deferring old-growth logging in the Fairy Creek watershed and central Walbran areas.

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Discovery Islanders making the trek to Fairy Creek

The following report contains trigger words which some may find offensive and opinions which are not necessarily shared by Cortes Radio, its Board, staff, volunteers or listeners.

At this point, Cortes Currents is aware of 14 Discovery Island residents who made the trek to Fairy Creek and there could easily be dozens more.

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The Last stand: Fairy Creek

By Melissa Renwick, Ha-Shilth-Sa, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Port Renfrew, BC – After over a decade of documenting B.C.’s last remaining old-growth ecosystems, TJ Watt said he hadn’t come across anything quite like the grove of red cedars hidden in the upper reaches of the Caycuse watershed, near Port Renfrew.

“It was truthfully one of the most stunning old-growth forests I’ve been in,” said the co-founder of the Ancient Forest Alliance. “The sheer volume of giant cedars was mind-blowing – every direction you looked was another 10 to 12-foot-wide ancient cedar that could be 800 years old, or older.”

When he returned later that year in 2020, only their stumps remained.

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