Tag Archives: CleanBC

BC Ferries urged to chart a new course around LNG

Editor’s note: The MV Tacheck, which sails between Heriot Bay and Whaletown, has a 200 kW-hr battery bank and is considered BC Ferries’ first ‘hybrid ferry.’ However it was built in 1969 and The Tachek’s primary power source is conventional diesel engines. It is currently scheduled to be replaced by one of the six Island Class hybrid-electric ferries in 2027. BC Ferries CEO Nicolas Jimenez told Cortes Currents that as the infrastructure to go fully electric is not in place, the new ferry will initially have to rely in its diesel engines.

 “I would say the technology hasn’t quite caught up  to us, but in 20 years, 40 years, 60 years, 80 years, I think that would be a very different proposition.  We might have different energy sources like hydrogen (and others) that today aren’t really being explored as viable in this industry, that could be with advances in technology. I think we have to be open minded about the whole thing, but it’s definitely going to be a cleaner, greener future.”

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

BC Ferries has launched a bid to build up to seven green flagship vessels but climate groups are urging the company to abandon liquified natural gas to fuel ships and speed electrification of its fleet to reach its emissions targets. 

The ferry service recently revealed it has teamed up with a naval architectural firm to develop an early design to replace six large aging vessels and expand capacity on the busiest routes between the mainland and Vancouver Island. 

Continue reading BC Ferries urged to chart a new course around LNG

Eyes turn to B.C. as U.S. pauses approval of LNG projects

Editor’s note: According to Natural Resources Canada, “There are eight liquefied natural gas (LNG) export projects in various stages of development across Canada.” At one point there were 20 proposals in BC alone. One of them was on the old mill site in Campbell River. The most recent post Cortes Currents could find on the web was a Jan 21, 2019 article in the Campbell River Mirror which states a Calgary-based company, Rockyview Resources Inc, purchased the property in May 2016. “Rockyview is an oil and gas exploration firm that aims to build a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at the site, a project dubbed Discovery LNG.”  The company’s website is no longer operational and Rockyview Resources Inc was ‘struck off the registry’ of Alberta Corporations on Nov 2, 2017. Discovery LNG is not on Canada’s list of LNG ‘Projects proposed and under construction,’ but it is listed as one of Campbell River’s top 10 municipal taxpayers for 2022 (albeit under a different owner).

By Matteo Cimellaro, Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Calls from climate advocates to follow the lead of the United States and pause Canadian liquified natural gas projects face a serious challenge: a promise of economic reconciliation tied to capital and liquified natural gas (LNG) development.

Biden’s move to pause LNG approvals until after the November elections was celebrated by the climate movement in the U.S. and at home. But coastal First Nations leading LNG projects say the facilities will boost their communities’ prosperity. With industry partners, Haisla Nation is developing Cedar LNG and Ksi Lisims is proposed by the Nisga’a.

Continue reading Eyes turn to B.C. as U.S. pauses approval of LNG projects

BC Hydro must pay up for overcharging remote First Nations

Editors note: Though Hartley Bay is about 450 km north of us, in the Douglas Channel, there are aspects of the following article that should be of concern to all British Columbians. Firstly, what justification is there for a charge that only applies to First Nations communities and not neighbouring ‘non-Indigenous’ communities ‘in the same rate class.’ Secondly, even if there is a justification, why weren’t the First Nations consulted?

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

BC Hydro has been ordered to repay a small coastal First Nation more than $700,000 after unfairly charging them an extra annual fee for electricity for nearly a decade. 

The $85,000 yearly fee, embedded in a 2014 electricity service agreement between the utility company and the tiny Gitga’at First Nation of Hartley Bay, wasn’t approved and was ruled as “unjust, unreasonable and unduly discriminatory” by the province’s energy regulator this fall

Continue reading BC Hydro must pay up for overcharging remote First Nations

BC Ferries forced to gear down vessel electrification ambitions

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

BC Ferries has officially changed course, scaling down its climate ambitions to electrify its Island Class fleet and ability to achieve provincial emissions targets. 

In 2021, the provincial ferry service got permission for the first phase of its Island Class Electrification Program (ICEP) — to convert the six Island Class diesel-electric hybrid ferries it has currently in operation to 100 per cent battery-electric operations by 2025. 

Continue reading BC Ferries forced to gear down vessel electrification ambitions

West Coast electric ferries lack the power to ditch diesel

 Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

BC Ferries got a half-billion-dollar cash injection on the weekend to keep fares below inflation and help electrify the fleet. 

However, while Premier David Eby and Transportation Minister Rob Fleming offered details on fare objectives over the next four years, they provided little information on the province’s goals for weaning ferries off fossil fuels.  

Continue reading West Coast electric ferries lack the power to ditch diesel