Tag Archives: Indigenous repatriations

Ni’isjoohl memorial pole is coming home

Windspeaker, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

The Nisga’a Nation, and especially the house of Ni’isjoohl, is celebrating a Dec. 1st announcement from the National Museum of Scotland. It will return a memorial pole that was stolen from Nisga’a territory and later acquired by the museum.

“In Nisga’a culture, we believe that this pole is alive with the spirit of our ancestor,” said Sim’oogit Ni’ijoohl, Chief Earl Stephens.

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Tla’amin: Better museums; better history

qathet Living, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

In the movement to decolonize BC’s museums, one of the most accomplished professionals is a member of Tla’amin Nation: Siemthlut (Michelle Washington.)

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Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations sign memorandums of understanding with the Museum of North Vancouver

By Charlie Carey, North Shore News, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

A first for any museum in Coast Salish territories, MONOVA: the Museum of North Vancouver, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation) and Səlílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nation have signed respective memorandums of understanding, in an effort to strengthen the relationship between the two host Nations and the museum.̓

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Mass arests at the 1921 Potlatch

By Catherine Lafferty, the Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Almost 100 years ago, while many gathered with family members to exchange Christmas presents, several dozen Kwakwa̱ka̱ʼwakw people were arrested for holding a winter gifting Potlatch of their own.

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Bringing Klahoose ancestors home

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

The Klahoose Nation’s traditional winter village lies at the head of Toba Inlet on B.C.’s west coast along the southernmost flank of the Great Bear Rainforest.

Nearby, alongside the Tahumming River, is an old cemetery sparsely covered with wooden or stone markers, mainly active while the Klahoose still lived in the Toba.

But some markers sit at the head of holed out graves, fenced off with care despite being empty.

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