Tag Archives: UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Reconciliation on the back burner

By Anna McKenzie,  The Discourse, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Canada delivered its Speech from the Throne to signal a new session of parliament on Wednesday. The speech was largely focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and the middle class. After a tumultuous 10months following the previous throne speech, including a global pandemic, the Wet’suwet’en crisis, and several high profile police brutality cases upon BIPOC in Canada (and in the United States), the federal government has said that they will be moving towards expediting several of its commitments to Indigenous Peoples. But for Kukip7 Judy Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer of theUnion of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), reconciliation has been put on the back burner. 

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ZOOM/radio townhall meeting with Rachel Blaney

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

It started with an email forwarded to one of the Cortes Radio team. Our Member of Parliament was having a ZOOM chat. We asked to broadcast the chat over the radio. While this did not work out, it led to the ZOOM/radio townhall meeting with Rachel Blaney on September 22, 2020. 

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Grand Chief Stewart Phillip calls snap election a demonstration of strong leadership

By Dale Boyd, Times Chronicle, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, is supporting the snap election called by Premier John Horgan and the NDP Monday calling it a “demonstration of strong leadership.”

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Bringing Klahoose ancestors home

Canada’s National Observer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

The Klahoose Nation’s traditional winter village lies at the head of Toba Inlet on B.C.’s west coast along the southernmost flank of the Great Bear Rainforest.

Nearby, alongside the Tahumming River, is an old cemetery sparsely covered with wooden or stone markers, mainly active while the Klahoose still lived in the Toba.

But some markers sit at the head of holed out graves, fenced off with care despite being empty.

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A legal Observation Of ‘The Rule Of Law’

Originally published on Cortes Radio.ca. This radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

Opinions expressed in the article that follow are not necessarily shared by Cortes Currents, its board, or other producer/authors. Trigger warning: The following program contains graphic descriptions of serious human rights violations.

Tactical teams with assault- and sniper-rifles dropped out of black helicopters.  Specially trained military-style police demonstrated snowmobile stunt skills.  Indigenous heroes sang songs of love and consequences on a Mad-Max battle-bus.  There appeared to be directors and cinematographers.  It was a high-budget production.  I had a front-row seat and played the role of Legal Observer. 

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