Tag Archives: Squirrel Cove Bear

Coexisting in Black Bear country

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

“This is black bear country. It has always been black bear country. Northern Cortes Island is likely where most of the bears live. Black bears can travel very far in one day and they are good swimmers. They do travel from island to island and there are likely year-round bears here. In the fall of 2019, there was a bear sighted at Blue Jay Lake. Then in April 2020, there was a black bear around Green Mountain. Since then, we’ve had conflicts with two bears: one in Whaletown and one in Squirrel Cove,” said Autumn Barrett-Morgan, a volunteer co-ordinator with the Friends of Cortes Island’s wildlife COEXistence program.

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Frequency of bear raids decreasing in Squirrel Cove

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

After two very intensive weeks, the frequency of bear raids along Squirrel Cove road, on Cortes Island, appears to be decreasing. 

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Squirrel Cove Bear Song: Bear in my Bubble

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

In Saturday’s half hour Cortes Currents magazine, which will repeat at 9 AM on Wednesday, we described a human/bear situation developing in Squirrel Cove, on Cortes Island. There has been a bear in the Squirrel Cove vicinity for a year or more. At this point, there are believed to be two bears. Earlier this month, one of them started breaking into fenced yards to the steal fruit. Manuel Perdisa wrote the song “Bear in my Bubble” about one of these incidents. 

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The Squirrel Cove Bear


This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative

Curt Cunningham first encountered the Squirrel Cove Bear while it was still a cub. Not knowing where the creature’s mother was, Cunningham took refuge inside the Cove Restaurant. No mother bear appeared and the cub disappeared into the woods. That was a year or more ago. 

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